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Citation Styles: MLA Style

Learn about different citation styles

MLA Style

MLA In-Text Citation

Basic in-text citation rules

"In MLA Style, referring to the works of others in your text is done using parenthetical citations. This method involves providing relevant source information in parentheses whenever a sentence uses a quotation or paraphrase. Usually, the simplest way to do this is to put all of the source information in parentheses at the end of the sentence (i.e., just before the period). However, as the examples below will illustrate, there are situations where it makes sense to put the parenthetical elsewhere in the sentence, or even to leave information out."

MLA In-Text Citations: The Basics

man holding sign that says "Always put punctuation after the parenthetical citation"

 

Purdue Owl In-text citations

MLA Sample Paper

Purdue MLA Formatting

MLA Formatting-first page and pagination

Each citation style has its own unique formatting. MLA Style does not require a cover page; however, be sure to check with your instructor. You will need to know how to use pagination and format the first page. Select "MLA First Page" below to access a brief tutorial that demonstrates how to properly format your paper.

MLA First Page

List of Sources

Remember that in addition to in-text citations, you'll also need to include a list of all the sources you used. In MLA Style, the sources are listed on a Works Cited page. In order to list those citations properly, we recommend using Purdue OWL as a reference. Click here to access Purdue OWL. Once you go to their website, notice the tabs on the left of the page. Use the tabs to access various information. Click here to go to Purdue OWL.

Cite Right!

In-text citation

Basic Style for Citations of Electronic Sources (Including Online Databases)

Author. "Title." Title of container (self contained if book), Other contributors (translators or editors), Version (edition), Number (vol. and/or no.),          Publisher, Publication Date, Location (pages, paragraphs and/or URL, DOI or permalink). 2nd container’s title, Other contributors, Version, Number, Publisher, Publication date, Location, Date of Access (if applicable).

Alonso, Alvaro, and Julio A. Camargo. Toxicity of Nitrite to Three Species of Freshwater Invertebrates. Environmental Toxicology, vol. 21, no. 1, 3  Feb. 2006, pp. 90-94. Wiley Online Library, https://doi.org/10.1002/tox.20155. Accessed 26 May 2009.

MLA Video

MLA Formatting

Works Cited Page

MLA Style requires a "Works Cited" page to list all your sources. Some instructors may require an "Annotated List of Works Cited." Click below to watch a brief tutorial that shows how to format your Works Cited page.

Click here

Summary

Now you know what MLA Style Citation is. There's no reason to panic now. You can write this paper and do a good job. Know where to look for information on formatting. We recommend Purdue OWL. The ERC provides about 10,000 books at 58 databases for you to find credible sources. If you're still having trouble with that paper, come by the ERC at the campus nearest you and speak with a tutor. You don't even have to leave your living room. Just contact a tutor and they'll set up a virtual tutoring session via Blackboard Collaborate Ultra!

Now that you know where to find the information you need, RELAX!

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